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onway Daily Sun can attest, hordes of Eastmans have lived in and around Conway, hailing from an assortment of tribes. Alfred Eastman, who was born in Kearsarge in 1843, made an effort at farming in his youth but soon gravitated to the hotel business. He remained in that line of work for the …

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Harry Chandler Blanchard did not rise from auspicious beginnings. His parents were Canadian immigrants who worked in the cotton mills of Lawrence, Mass., and he lost his father at an early age, but he did all three things that still almost always lift people out of the cycle of poverty. He g…

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Enough city people were summering in North Conway by the height of the Civil War that James T. Randall thought he might be able to earn some extra money by taking in boarders. Jonathan Melvin Seavey owned a big rooming house on the west side of Main Street, near River Road, and in June of 18…

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Joel Eastman’s house remains virtually unchanged since it was built, upwards of two centuries ago. In 1860, publishers of a detailed map of Carroll County found his home the only one in Conway worthy of an illustration, and the primitive engraving shown here appeared on the upper right-hand …

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Alfred Eastman made his fortune without going far from home. He was born in Kearsarge in 1843, married young and stayed home from the Civil War to work in North Conway’s growing hotel business. Tourism took a great leap immediately after that war, as it does after every war, and Eastman star…

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From the 1880s, Mary Jackson lived in a sprawling, poorly maintained farmhouse on Davis Hill. Her youngest son, Bill, stayed on when his father died in 1902, but after World War I he moved his family into town, including his mother. He kept farming the land, but in 1928 he and his brothers t…

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The “new” Conway Village Grammar School, built on the old school lot beside the then-Congregational church on Main Street in 1886, originally accommodated students through the eighth grade. In 1912, the building was jacked up and moved to the back of the lot near Pequawket Pond, and two room…

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Arven Blanchard’s family brought him to Sandwich as a boy in the 1840s. As the youngest son, Arven remained with his aging parents even after he was married. On their farm he had been the one to do the butchering, and in the 1850s he set up shop in that capacity at Sandwich Lower Corner. Wit…

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Edwin Snow was the youngest son of Joseph Snow, the self-made man whose numerous children populated what became known as Snowville. Like his father, who built a gristmill and sawmill on Snow Brook to augment his farm income, Edwin was an inveterate wheeler-dealer who was eternally on the loo…

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It was a pleasant afternoon in the 1890s when a photographer propped his camera in the middle of the Cushing Corner Road to capture the rustic peace of Freedom Village. Although he probably did not know it, he was choosing a period of slow but certain transition for the town’s center of busi…

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At one time, a total of 20 individual school districts existed in Conway, when “local control” really meant something. Five of those districts existed within the confines of Goshen, as South Conway was called well into the 20th century. The two largest, Districts 16 and 18, paralleled each o…

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You have to be more than half a century old to remember when New England’s towering elm trees came down, and a couple of decades older than that to recall how stubbornly they resisted splitting with a hammer and steel wedges. When George French photographed Fryeburg, Maine’s world-famous Dou…

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The house shown here is only one of many buildings in North Conway associated with Harvey Dow Gibson. More than any other single person, he made his mark on the village of his birth, where community leaders had always wanted to promote tourism. Thanks largely to Harvey, they got their wish g…

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At least from the late 1840s, the perpendicular crossroads by Crystal Lake in Eaton Center was known as Robertson’s Corner. For that matter, until New Hampshire started renaming its water bodies as a ploy to lure summering strangers, Crystal Lake was called Robertson’s Pond. The name was der…