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There is still a town road in Conway called Old Goshen Road, but it’s just a development road that some think was part of the original route from Center Conway to the heart of South Conway. I remember it as a mere logging road.

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With the opening of the Mount Washington Stage Road in 1861, North Conway and Jackson began sprouting new lodging establishments. Jackson already had the Jackson Falls House and the Forest Vale House, but a third hostelry opened up on the other side of the Ellis River, right beside the narro…

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One of the Indian trails that served Conway settlers as an early roadway ran from Fryeburg, Maine, through Conway Center. Half a mile past that village, the trail veered across a ford in the Saco River near a cabin inhabited by John Dolloff, then climbed the hill past Conway’s first meetingh…

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In the era before automobiles dominated life and landscape, the location of the U.S. Post Office usually identified the center of any town, and sometimes it decided where the center of town would gravitate. That was the case in Berlin, and sometime around 1908 someone snapped a photo of Post…

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In the 1850s, the proprietors of the Grand Trunk Railway helped to engineer a new boom in White Mountain tourism, prompting regional speculators to built grand hotels on both sides of Pinkham Notch, from Conway Village to Gorham.

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In December of 1938, the Conway School Board solicited bids for building two wings on the 1923-vintage Kennett High School. The three-story east wing was to contain several new classrooms, including a science lab, with a kitchen in the basement for the then-popular Home Economics curriculum.…

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Determining the vintage of this wintertime image of North Conway’s Main Street took some thought. The black car at right appears to be a 1940 Plymouth, and it’s the newest model distinguishable. Parked just to the left in the middle distance is Carroll Reed’s 1938 Ford “woodie” station wagon…

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Photographers at the beginning of the 20th century were fascinated by Fryeburg, Maine’s picturesque Main Street and the pedestrian walkway beneath twin rows of towering elms was a favorite subject. The trees, which dated from about 1840, lined both sides of the street from Fryeburg Academy t…

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Around 1822, Eaton pioneer Joseph Snow brought his family down from his first mountain homestead to live on the main road from Brownfield to Eaton Center.

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Center Conway did not change much during the first two decades of the 20th century. Most homes were passed down through the family, instead of sold to strangers, and commercial enterprises served the community that already existed, rather than depending on unsustainable growth. Home occupati…

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At the dawn of the 20th century, both Conway and North Conway had attracted a fair number of Catholic residents. The earliest were Irish, who came in the 1870s and ’80s to work in the hotels and the mills.

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Religious fervor and political animosities combined after the Civil War to spawn a flurry of new church societies in Conway — and across much of the country, for that matter. Tensions between Republicans and Democrats in Conway led to the formation of a Methodist church there, which split fr…

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Gustave Mahler was drawing his final breath in Vienna as the sun rose on May 18, 1911. The Titanic was about to slide down the ways at a Belfast, Northern Ireland, shipyard. In Mexico City, revolutionaries were preparing to overthrow President Porfirio Diaz. But it was a bright, warm day in …