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With immigrant families pouring into town to work in the mills, and a new state law forcing the entire town to bear the cost of any new schools within its boundaries, Conway Village built a new grammar school in 1886. It was erected on Main Street beside the village church. For a quarter-cen…

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The idea of making money from a lodging place overlooking the intervale and Mount Washington is hardly new. One building that has enjoyed that view for about 235 years has provided its owners for most of that time with income from renting rooms to people who want to enjoy it with their morni…

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The first bridge Conway voters authorized over the Swift River was built in 1793. It probably wasn’t in this particular spot, and it was low enough that floods frequently damaged it until voters approved a completely new bridge in 1834. That one washed away altogether. In 1869 Jacob Berry bu…

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As in many other backwoods communities, the struggling farmers in the town of Adams, N.H., gravitated toward low-church religious denominations. Like their counterparts in the bony hills of South Conway and Eaton, where flat land was not to be found and soil lay thin between the rocks, the F…

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The scene depicted by the antique postcard here is easy to locate, given a little familiarity with Fryeburg history. The date is more difficult to estimate, but with allowance for a little speculation it might be narrowed down considerably

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There is still a town road in Conway called Old Goshen Road, but it’s just a development road that some think was part of the original route from Center Conway to the heart of South Conway. I remember it as a mere logging road.

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With the opening of the Mount Washington Stage Road in 1861, North Conway and Jackson began sprouting new lodging establishments. Jackson already had the Jackson Falls House and the Forest Vale House, but a third hostelry opened up on the other side of the Ellis River, right beside the narro…

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One of the Indian trails that served Conway settlers as an early roadway ran from Fryeburg, Maine, through Conway Center. Half a mile past that village, the trail veered across a ford in the Saco River near a cabin inhabited by John Dolloff, then climbed the hill past Conway’s first meetingh…

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In the era before automobiles dominated life and landscape, the location of the U.S. Post Office usually identified the center of any town, and sometimes it decided where the center of town would gravitate. That was the case in Berlin, and sometime around 1908 someone snapped a photo of Post…

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In the 1850s, the proprietors of the Grand Trunk Railway helped to engineer a new boom in White Mountain tourism, prompting regional speculators to built grand hotels on both sides of Pinkham Notch, from Conway Village to Gorham.

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In December of 1938, the Conway School Board solicited bids for building two wings on the 1923-vintage Kennett High School. The three-story east wing was to contain several new classrooms, including a science lab, with a kitchen in the basement for the then-popular Home Economics curriculum.…

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Determining the vintage of this wintertime image of North Conway’s Main Street took some thought. The black car at right appears to be a 1940 Plymouth, and it’s the newest model distinguishable. Parked just to the left in the middle distance is Carroll Reed’s 1938 Ford “woodie” station wagon…

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Photographers at the beginning of the 20th century were fascinated by Fryeburg, Maine’s picturesque Main Street and the pedestrian walkway beneath twin rows of towering elms was a favorite subject. The trees, which dated from about 1840, lined both sides of the street from Fryeburg Academy t…