WASHINGTON, D.C. — U.S. Sens. Jeanne Shaheen and Maggie Hassan and Reps. Annie Kuster and Chris Pappas announced the award of over $26.6 million in federal funding to help combat the substance use disorder epidemic.

The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration announced the award of $22,982,608 in grants for the remainder of Fiscal Year 2019, under the State Opioid Response grant program.

This is the second allotment of $22.9 million to be made available to the state due to the New Hampshire congressional delegation’s successful negotiations of the bipartisan budget agreement in 2018.

New Hampshire will receive a total of nearly $35 million in SOR grants in Fiscal Year 2019, more than a 10-fold increase compared to FY 2017.

New Hampshire will use the SOR grant dollars to increase access to substance use disorder treatment and recovery supports, and enhance efforts to prevent substance misuse.

In addition, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has awarded $3,672,978 in new federal funding to the New Hampshire Department of Health and Human Services.

The grant comes as part of the CDC’s Overdose Data to Action program, which awards federal funding in support of helping recipients obtain high-quality, more comprehensive, and timely data on overdose morbidity and mortality and use that data to inform prevention and response efforts.

Over the past two years, Congress has provided approximately $475 million per year in funding for CDC to bolster support for opioid overdose prevention and surveillance.

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