Tele-Talk: What should be done to improve parking at Diana's Baths?

The growing popularity of Diana's Baths on West Side Road has created unsafe parking conditions along the road. A property owner told selectmen recently that he and his family even have trouble getting out of their driveway. Selectmen agreed to put up "no parking" signs and are also urging the federal government to expand the parking lot for Diana's Baths.

This week's Tele-Talk: What should be done to improve parking at Diana's Baths?

Call 733-5822 Saturday and Sunday and leave your comments on our machine. You may fax your responses to 356-8360 or e-mail them to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. Comments can also be posted on The Conway Daily Sun's Facebook page. Results will be published Tuesday.

Tele-Talk question: Do you think the court system is doing its part in addressing the opioid epidemic?

There were 15 responses to this week’s Tele-Talk question: “Do you think the court system is doing its part in addressing the opioid epidemic?” Eight people said the court system is not doing its part; the rest identified other things that should be addressed: four people blamed underlying causes, from government and industrial corruption to poor nutrition and cultural values; two people said the country needs to stop the flow of opioids across the border into the United States; one said better treatment, particularly treatment that would address withdrawal, is the key.

I have to agree with Police Chief Ed Wagner that the court is not doing enough to put these drug abusers away. Put them away for life, send them to Antarctica, do whatever you want with them. This is something they’re doing voluntarily. They’re injecting these drugs in their own bodies. The taxpayers are trying to bail them out to prevent this. My good tax money is going to a bunch of weirdos and drug addicts trying to get high, who go out and cause trouble, robberies, beating people up, home invasions — you name it, they do it. I don’t feel any sadness at all when I read in the paper or hear on the news that one of them has died from an overdose; I say good. That gets one more scumbag out of society that we have to worry about supporting for the rest of his life while he is on one of these illicit drug deals.

The court system is doing the best it can with the opioid epidemic. However, the problem does lie with the fact that all the material and drugs come from Mexico. We should build the wall and we should have Trump as president to carry this stuff out because the current policy does not work. Progressive liberalism is destroying this country and family values, which is also important to the epidemic.

No, the whole country stinks because of the corrupt big mouths locally and nationally that are always looking to cash in on everything. It’s industrial-strength corruption from top to bottom, from the president to the prison system, it’s an extension of Obamacare from cradle to grave. Look at our country and listen to the endless stupidity from people who never shut up. Fire everyone and start over. Prohibition doesn’t work and recidivism is human nature. You can’t cure it but you can kill it, and that’s the only way to solve this problem.

Everyone in Carroll County knows that the county attorney we have in office right now is absolutely horrible. He couldn’t do anything to help anybody out. He needs to go. Thank God he didn’t run again. Move on. Hopefully the next person in office can do a better job.

Until our society as a whole starts to deal with truth and the lack of denial, nothing will change. We are a nation addicted to being addicted, a nation that prefers being high over living in reality. Blaming pain, doctors, drug dealers and everyone else for addiction is denying what the nation refuses to face. Most humans are in pain, experienced abysmal childhoods and a plethora of mixed toxic experiences. Our prisons have the highest number of inmates of any Western nation, and immature individuals continue to populate a bulging world with a now decreased opportunity for a satisfactory life. Parents are frequently apprehended using drugs in full view of their children.

We conveniently blame an ambiguous perpetrator that has been named a “disease” on addictions, thus removing all liability from the individual. Every human has the potential to become an addict by choosing just once, to “try” something. America needs to grow up and understand that “feeling good” is not a condition of being human or living in a successful nation that holds up the yardstick to the rest of the world.   

In my opinion the court system has not done its part to help with this horrible problem. Chief Wagner is spot on when he asserts that one of the major problems is accountability with the judges. When I was much younger, traffickers were dealt with more harshly and long sentences were not unusual. Over a period of time, the focus seems to have incredibly shifted to punishing the user and giving pusher less time in jail. Now, the pendulum has shifted once again, thank God, to helping the user, but easy bail and the relatively short prison sentences have remained and have failed to deter traffickers. If federal prosecutors could put some of this scum away for up to 20 years, the issue of these pushers replacing each other might not be as prevalent. It’s time to get tough  — real tough — on those who are dealing. It’s time to set examples. The time of imprisoning someone for using opioids should be replaced by imprisoning someone for selling them and then throwing away the key. The fact is, judges are in a position to do much to help solve this problem from the bench. Ted Sares, North Conway.

I beg to differ with the statement, “Solving the opioid epidemic in Mount Washington Valley starts at the bench.” This is short sighted and wrong, like saying heart disease is solved under the surgeon’s knife, or mental illness is solved by spending more money on providing more beds and intervention. These are all wag-the-dog crisis management reactions to the far deeper issues that manifest in symptoms, which never address the  genesis of the pathology. To deal with root causes, we’d have to hold our own society accountable for creating sick children, both physically, mentally  and, most of all, spiritually, sending so many of them to the needle or alcohol or other addictions so rampant in Western culture. The judge’s gavel is intervention, just the same as prescription drugs and early diagnostics have become the definition of “health care” while doing absolutely nothing to prevent the genesis of disease, our concept of food and agriculture and wayward relationship with nature. As an ex-addict who spent 16 months in a live-in program called DARTEC, Drug Abusers Rehabilitated Through Educational Community, I have insight and hindsight into the world of drugs, why numbing oneself becomes desirable, and most importantly, the key to reducing addictions, which is examined in the links provided. Nutrient deficiency and excess toxicity  equals disease — no different in mental, physical or moral, considering our concept of food manifests in most of what ails humanity. By the time anyone gets to “the bench” or, in “medicine,” the doctors office, symptoms have had to have begun long before. Eliminate cause, and find the lasting cure. We’ve clearly created the perfect storm these problems arose from that require deeper thinking and holistic healing. See this article to on how proper nutrition is critical for recovery: www.todaysdietitian.com/newarchives/120914p44.shtml. Laura Slitt.

The following responses were posted on Facebook:

Treatment is the key. Someone needs to come up with a cheap, fast, easy and comfortable way to get off of them. The problem is you become deathly ill for months, even years, when you stop so if you’re doing them illegally you will do anything to get more so you don’t feel sick. And I’m not talking a little uncomfortable, I’m talking “curled up on the couch wishing you would die” sick. I guarantee if you ask 100 people on opiates, “if there was an easy way to stop, would you?” 100 of them would say yes! The problem is it’s such a slow drawn-out process to get off of them people just say screw it, it’s easier to just stay on it. You can arrest people all day long, but if you don’t come up with a way to get them off the opiates you’re just wasting your time.

I think the police force is doing its job. It is the courts in the legal system that are holding up progress. When you find someone who was a dealer, you hit them with the maximum penalty, not let them out on bail and slap him on the wrist because they are first-time offenders. It may have been the first time they have been caught, but I can guarantee you it was not the first time they have dealt with it.

No, the court is not doing its job. When a drug dealer is brought in front of the court, no bail should be given. Doing this will take the product off the street and show the cops that the courts are in step with the police. When the court just lets them out, it tells the cops it all for nothing, and then cops have to start all over, and another kid or adult is hooked or dead of an overdose.

How about stopping the flow of opioids across the border into the United States?

If the judge is going to let a drug dealer out on bail then it should be mandatory that they go to rehab.

No.

The opioid crisis is not a state corporation money-maker and costs the state corporation money.

I have seen first-hand the courts in step with the police department; the police and courts are in bed together when it comes time for fines or any other way to make money for the corporation, but when it comes time for opioid crisis, it’s time for them to spend money, and any corporation, such as state of New Hampshire, cannot stay in business without making money. Opioids are a direct hit on the corporation’s pocketbook because it is a costly epidemic, and although people think it costs the taxpayer, think again. It costs the state corporation through revenue they collect through court fines, and I for one think it’s about time the corporate state of New Hampshire starts to man up and pay up as they are the sole causation.

People would not be doing those drugs if they had a good life, in which the corporate state destroys people’s lives by taking people away from their families and jobs by putting them in jail. When a person has nothing left to take away, then they turn to drugs. I, again, have witnessed this first hand, so no, it’s a conjunctive state effort, not the police or any other single entity. It’s the corporate state’s money problem to see that people get help instead of throwing them in jail, which seems to be the solution to everything today, as you can see America has the biggest prison population in the world. Why? Because the corporate state is in business to make money, and when they can’t make or steal money from someone, they threaten them with jail time, which completely destroys the direction a person should head in. It’s about time a costly enterprise makes the money-stealing corporation pay.

Don’t say it’s taxpayers money. Just look at the town reports of how much the corporate state steals from people in their courts. Folks, the corporate state is a business, and this epidemic is just a big expense that the corporate state needs to pay and contend with, as they are the creators of these problems. Good to see they have to give back to society for a change instead of robbing poor innocent people and destroying their lives with jails and prisons.

There is no excuse to not follow the moral code of the land and do what is right. If everyone would do this, there would be no need for police. As for a money-making machine, do a quick Google search and look at the state budget it’s all there to prove your claims false.

Tele-Talk responses: Would you like to someday see the sixth grades become part of the middle school?

There were seven responses to this week’s Tele-Talk question, “Would you like to someday see the sixth grades become part of the middle school?” Three said they would like to see the sixth grade moved to the middle school; three said they would not; one said he would like more information before he forms an opinion.

Move the sixth grade to the middle school now; the school board has said it is far better the education of our students. They have already wasted 10 years, and they want to waste 10 more years. We as parents should move for a warrant article to tell the school board what they should be doing. John.

I don’t believe sixth-graders have the emotional maturity to interact with kids that are in seventh and eighth grades. I would like to see ninth-graders become part of Kennett Middle School. I think that would be wiser than throwing goldfish in with the sharks.

Moving sixth grade students to the middle school should not be about money. It should be about keeping the kids in their home schools with peers their age. I found it interesting that the reason for not moving them at this time is how much it would cost the district over the next 10 years. Even though the multiple studies and committee work done by administrators, teachers, business leaders and parents over the years have always recommended not moving the students (Randy Davison’s comment aside that “It is what the people want.” Maybe he has spoken to them by phone behind the school board’s back), their work was disregarded until the school board did their research and found the cost prohibitive. Moving sixth grade students to the middle school should never occur and parents need to speak up to keep their kids in their community schools. I don’t believe any parent would want their 11-year-old son or daughter getting on a school bus at 6:30 a.m. with 18-year-old high school students.

I agree with Randy Davidson and Syndi White that we should do what is educationally best for our students and consolidate grades 6-8 and close one elementary school. Unfortunately, Mark Hounsell feels that dollars should win out by spreading students out over the three Conway elementary schools in order to keep them open so as to continue charging the sending towns for these mostly empty school buildings. This is akin to using our children as hostages in order to ransom funds from the sending towns. Nice move, Hounsell! I wonder what the sending towns of Madison, Freedom, Albany, Eaton, etc. think of all this? Sending towns pay $17 million of the $35 million Conway school budget. Not only that, they pay half the cost of the Conway school bonds which they were never allowed to vote on. Their total cost per student is now twice as high as the tuition of the surrounding private schools. A lot has happened since these 20-year tuition contracts were signed 10 years ago, and a lot more will happen in the next 10 years. For sure we can count on Conway not cutting school costs, public school enrollment continuing to decline and surrounding private schools continuing to flourish. I would not be surprised if ad-hoc committees are being formed in the sending towns if they haven’t been already. Of particular interest I am sure, are the cancellation clauses in these 20-year tuition contracts. Inadvertently, they provide the opportunity of three-year contracts if canceled every three-years. Hummmm?  

Yes, I think the sixth grade should be part of middle school. Conway is not the small town it once was. Think about this one. The class of 2020, this years incoming freshmen, are the boom felt after Sept. 11, 2001. I believe it was the first year that you had to attend the elementary school in your area, and could not choose the school you wanted. There is plenty of space for the change and it is not used. It will also possible create positions in the school district. I grew up in a central Ohio school system that at the time had five elementary, two middle, and one high school. Toward the end of my schooling, that had grown to add one middle school. My graduating class was 600-plus. The school system has grown since, adding more buildings to connect the three original high school builds from 1990. So, in closing, yes, we should be moving the sixth grade to Kennett Middle School. Eric from Conway.

I’d like to know little bit more about this and what it’s gonna cost us before I make any answer to this question. We’re not being told anything and it’s just the same as it was last week. You don’t know what they’re going to do next.

As someone who enjoys lunch very frequently at the Gibson Center, I too have often said someday I’d like to see the sixth grade become part of Kennett Middle School. However, not today, not tomorrow and not in the distant future. And wouldn’t it be nice if we could all hold each other’s hands, sing Kumbaya and dance around the May Pole.

Tele-Talk: Do you think the court system is doing its part in addressing the opioid epidemic?

Solving the opioid epidemic in Mount Washington Valley "starts at the bench," Conway Police Chief Ed Wagner said at a roundtable discussion Aug. 16 in Conway. "We in law enforcement certainly can't arrest our way out of this," Wagner said. "I think one of the major problems...is accountability with the judges. When a judge lets a drug dealer out on bail and says, 'Hey, I'm not going to solve this problem from the bench,' that's a problem for me."

This week's Tele-Talk: Do you think the court system is doing its part in addressing the opioid epidemic?

Call 733-5822 Saturday and Sunday and leave your comments on our machine. You may fax your responses to 356-8360 or e-mail them to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. Comments can also be posted on The Conway Daily Sun's Facebook page. Results will be published Tuesday.

 

Tele-Talk: Would you like to someday see the sixth grades become part of the middle school?

Conway School Board said that while it might make sense educationally to move sixth-grades from the district's three elementary schools into Kennett Middle School, the board isn't inclined to make that happen for at least 10 years when the existing tuition contracts with the sending towns expire.

This week's question: Would you like to someday see the sixth grades become part of the middle school?

 

Call 733-5822 Saturday and Sunday and leave your comments on our machine. You may fax your responses to 356-8360 or e-mail them to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. Comments can also be posted on The Conway Daily Sun's Facebook page. Results will be published Tuesday.